Born in The U.S.A.- Bruce Springsteen (1984) Born In The U.S.A.

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Bruce Springsteen

Born down in a dead man's town
The first kick I took was when I hit the ground
You end up like a dog that's been beat too much
Till you spend half your life just covering up

Born in the USA
I was born in the USA
I was born in the USA
Born in the USA

Got in a little hometown jam
So they put a rifle in my hand
Send me off to a foreign land
To go and kill the yellow man

Born in the USA
I was born in the USA
I was born in the USA
I was born in the USA
Born in the USA

Come back home to the refinery
Hiring man says, 'son if it was up to me'
Went down to see my V.A. man
He said, 'son don't you understand'

I had a brother at Khe Sahn, fighting off the Viet Cong
They're still there, he's all gone
He had a woman he loved in Saigon
I got a picture of him in her arms now

Down in the shadow of the penitentiary
Out by the gas fires of the refinery
I'm ten years burning down the road
Nowhere to run, ain't got nowhere to go

Born in the USA
I was born in the USA
Born in the USA
I'm a long gone Daddy in the USA
Born in the USA
Born in the USA
Born in the USA
I'm a cool rocking Daddy in the USA

Analysis:
Bruce Springsteen’s Born In The U.S.A. confronts the harsh issues of the Vietnam War. The song discusses the issues that a soldier that went off to war faces. Springsteen writes about a man who went to war without requesting so, and came home to a totally demolished lifestyle. His brother died, and Vietnam is still communist and fighting. His life changed drastically when he came home and couldn’t get a job. Families were left husbandless and fatherless and Springsteen says that it was a useless fight. He went to the Veteran’s Administration and asked about a job, only to be rejected because so many other soldiers were in the same position. He was forced onto the battlefield, and his life at home and in the future was ruined.
This song is one of many protest songs written during and after the Vietnam War. Music allowed (and still does) for regular people to voice their opinion and gain followers who agree with their state of mind. Music was so popular then and now and is constantly listened to and viewed as a way of voicing opinion. Song can either ease the pain one has, or make the fire in the listener’s eye.
Today, music is still considered very popular and as a way to express oneself. Rock, soul, jazz, pop, rap, country, etc. all express the way’s of the American government and the country in general. American consumers buy these CD’s to listen to this expression and take a stand on the issue. There are just as many songs today about protest, as there always were. In present day music industries, singers and rappers constantly make music that voices their opinion on the Iraq War. Whether people agree with their choice of words or not, the protest is still there, and the opinion is still expressed. Though the styles may have changed a bit throughout the years, music is almost like a newspaper. It is a source of life that allows listeners to hear people’s stand’s on issues in America or internationally, and help encourage them to do the same. (Nina)

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